Home news 50 Cent Loses 'In Da Club' Lawsuit Against Rick Ross

50 Cent Loses 'In Da Club' Lawsuit Against Rick Ross

3,503 views | August 22, 2020 | News | By hiphopallaround

Apparently 50 Cent's year-long 'In Da Club' lawsuit against Rick Ross has reached its final destination. The lawsuit came following Ross' unapproved remix of Fif's hit single 'In Da Club' on his 2015 'Renzel Remixes' project, 50 filed a trademark infringement lawsuit against Ross asking for $2 million.


According to court papers, 'In Da Club' were recorded on his then-label Shady/Aftermath Records under the agreement that, “Jackson owns no copyright interest in ‘In Da Club.’” Jackson also gave Shady/Aftermath the “perpetual and exclusive rights during the term of [the Recording Agreement],” and a non-exclusive right to forever use 50’s name and likeness “for the purposes of trade, or for advertising purposes ... in connection with the marketing and exploitation of Phonograph Records and Covered Videos.”




The G-Unit rapper originally lost the legal battle in 2018 when courts ruled in favor of Rick Ross. The court found that he couldn't sue Ross for remixing the song, considering he had signed away his rights to the song according to the recording agreement with Shady/Aftermath. An appeals court upheld the decision on Wednesday, even though Ross didn't have the approval to put the song his mixtape, Ross is not liable for copyright infringement to 50 Cent, he could, however, be liable for copyright infringement to Shady/Aftermath.


Related News

Share With Social Media
 
 
 

Apparently 50 Cent’s year-long ‘In Da Club’ lawsuit against Rick Ross has reached its final destination. The lawsuit came following Ross’ unapproved remix of Fif’s hit single ‘In Da Club’ on his 2015 ‘Renzel Remixes’ project, 50 filed a trademark infringement lawsuit against Ross asking for $2 million.


According to court papers, ‘In Da Club’ were recorded on his then-label Shady/Aftermath Records under the agreement that, “Jackson owns no copyright interest in ‘In Da Club.’” Jackson also gave Shady/Aftermath the “perpetual and exclusive rights during the term of [the Recording Agreement],” and a non-exclusive right to forever use 50’s name and likeness “for the purposes of trade, or for advertising purposes … in connection with the marketing and exploitation of Phonograph Records and Covered Videos.”







The G-Unit rapper originally lost the legal battle in 2018 when courts ruled in favor of Rick Ross. The court found that he couldn’t sue Ross for remixing the song, considering he had signed away his rights to the song according to the recording agreement with Shady/Aftermath. An appeals court upheld the decision on Wednesday, even though Ross didn’t have the approval to put the song his mixtape, Ross is not liable for copyright infringement to 50 Cent, he could, however, be liable for copyright infringement to Shady/Aftermath.





Music Videos

mix tapes